Types of  Sjogren's Syndrome

 

There are 2 kinds of Sjogren's Syndrome - Primary and Secondary:

 1. Primary - localized mainly to the eyes and mouth

People with primary Sjogren's have a greater chance of extra glandular involvement.


Primary Sjogren's syndrome occurs by itself. 

Secondary Sjogren's syndrome occurs when another connective tissue disease is present.

Primary and secondary Sjogren’s can have the same symptoms. 

In primary Sjogren’s Syndrome, approximately 10 to 20 percent of people have neurological manifestations such as numbness and tingling in their hands and fingers and carpal tunnel syndrome. In many people these may be the initial symptoms when presenting to a doctor.
In primary Sjogren’s Syndrome, approximately 10 to 20 percent of people have neurological manifestations such as numbness and tingling in their hands and fingers, abnormal sweating, and carpal tunnel syndrome. 

In many people these may be the initial symptoms when presenting to a doctor. This can often mean that the doctor does not associate these symptoms with SS as they are expecting dry eyes and dry mouth symptoms when diagnosing SS. 

This may be a contributing factor in the long time it takes many people to get a correct diagnosis.
 

 2. Secondary - systemic - occuring in conjuction with other connective tissue diseases such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis.